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Ciudad Rodrigo

On the bank of the river Agueda, some twenty-five kilometres from the Portuguese border, sits the small Spanish town of Ciudad Rodrigo. The site of two sieges during the Napoleonic Wars it is now a largely uneventful place with a population of only fourteen-thousand people. Once a year during the five days leading up to Shrove Tuesday it hosts its Carnaval del Toros, an event which unites its celebration of Carnival with its love of the bulls.

During Carnival Ciudad Rodrigo is riddled with wooden barricades which serve to separate onlookers from the running bulls.

During Carnival Ciudad Rodrigo is riddled with wooden barricades which serve to separate onlookers from the running bulls.

 

A man pushes a carretón, or cart, a fake bull's head on wheels. During Carnival children play at running from bull's and passing bulls using these contraptions.

A man pushes a carretón, or cart, a fake bull’s head on wheels. During Carnival children play at running from bull’s and passing bulls using these contraptions.

 

Onlookers stand safely behind the barricades as the bulls run through the streets.

Onlookers stand safely behind the barricades as the bulls run through the streets.

 

The desencierro, a reverse encierro in which bulls are run through the streets from the bullring to the corrals at the edge of town.

The desencierro, a reverse encierro in which bulls are run through the streets from the bullring to the corrals at the edge of town.

 

A capea held in the town's make-shift bullring. During a capea, aficionados and thrillseekers are able to jump into the ring with calves or steers and demonstrate their skills in front of a large audience.

A capea held in the town’s make-shift bullring. During a capea, aficionados and thrillseekers are able to jump into the ring with calves or steers and demonstrate their skills in front of a large audience.

 

 

 

 

2 thoughts on “Ciudad Rodrigo

  1. Teresa Martín Gómez says:

    Thank you, Melanie.
    I am a “mirobrigense” (person born in Ciudad Rodrigo). The word comes from the ancient name of the city, Miróbriga.

    Well, I just wanted to say “thank you” for your beautiful description of our festival.

    Best regards,
    Teresa

  2. Melanie says:

    You’re very welcome, Teresa! I very much enjoyed my stay there and look forward to returning some day :)

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